Writing a book should bring joy to one’s life: #everydayiselectionday has to mine

gambitJF

Dear Readers:

I first visited New Orleans 32 years ago, falling in love with the place on sight. I was entranced by the (Mississippi) river, the music, the art, the people, and the city’s look and spirit. I’ve eagerly returned thirty-plus times in the years since. I hit these streets — every time — just as fiercely happy as the first time.

However, this time is particularly special.That’s because I have the honor of being part of a great New Orleans tradition, one that combines the city’s music, art, people and history in a singular way.That tradition is “Jazz Fest,” the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

Steve and I have attended 26 years of its 45. Our plan is to keep coming back as long as we can. We feel a part of it. But, this year, I will get to be part of it in a different way: tomorrow, I will be signing Every Day Is Election Day in the Jazz Fest Book Tent.

Great authors telling great stories have been in the Book Tent for many years. Every Day Is Election Day and I now get to share in that history because the book features three amazing Louisiana women: U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, now running for re-election; Catherine Kimball, first woman chief justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court; and Sharon Broome, State Senator and President Pro Tempore of the state senate.

Happy to have written this book? Yes, absolutely thrilled to share in the lives of women who care, stand and deliver; happy to tell their inspirational stories and impart their advice to other women who would lead; happy to be part of a community that respects committed women leaders everywhere.

Thanks to Jazz Fest, Garden Street Book Shop, Gambit, and dear friend Ben Sandmel for making this New Orleans-time so special.

Rebecca

On to California, in part to talk about a woman giving the #SOTU

stoptheslide

Dear Friends and Colleagues:

On #SOTU day, I invite you to join the campaign to engage more California women in running for office. (As California goes, so goes the nation.)

Led by Betsy Cotton and Mary Hughes, co-creator of the 2012 project of the Center for American Women and Politics, @Close the Gap California is the organizer.

I’m delighted to tell you I will join the campaign, speaking about the need for more women in politics and my guide for getting there:  #everydayiselectionday. I will be in the Bay Area, Los Angeles and San Diego. I hope you will encourage friends and colleagues there to join in, too.

Here is a recent review of #everydayiselectionday, from Jewish Women International (formerly B’nai Brith Women), which mentions some of the amazing women who could give the #SOTU, no doubt.

Best wishes.

Rebecca

When Business Women Lead, All Women Win

Dear Readers:

At this link is a playlist of my holiday video for bSMART on how business women win — for all women — when they choose to enter public life.

Screen shot 2013-08-03 at 1.38.43 PM I also spoke about the importance of business women’s leadership in the public square while on my recent book tour for Every Day Is Election Day:  A Woman’s Guide. I stressed the importance of business women’s leadership as a strategy to advance themselves (as well as the public good). I recommended becoming more powerful by:

  • developing a political network and profile,
  • building and maintaining an influential public presence,
  • creating a unique and issue-based personal brand and message,
  • making a positive, note-worthy difference in women’s and girl’s lives, and
  • seeking public office, (whether appointed or elected).

I welcome opportunities to share this presentation in this great New Year, likely to be the biggest year ever for American women who seek public leadership. Why not be one of them!

Best wishes.

Rebecca

Six Easy Rules You Never Want to Forget

speakingDear Readers:

During my book signing in New York last week, a great group gathered and thoughtfully discussed many aspects of women’s political experience in New York over the years.

Among recent chapters discussed was Christine Quinn’s difficult loss the week before in New York’s Democratic mayoral primary. I shared my piece about her difficulties, “Six Easy Rules Christine Quinn Forgot,” featured in Huffington Post New York.

Over the weekend, I thought some more about those “six easy rules” I lay-out in chapter one of Every Day Is Election Day, especially about rule number five: “success in politics is not a one-off.” With my mother and sister, celebrating my father’s, David Sive’s, 91st birthday, I remembered his defeat when, at age 36, he ran for Congress. Then, I remembered what happened next:  he became “the father of environmental law.” Not bad, I’d say.

Remember this, please, as you fight to win today but, maybe, lose.
Rebecca